Poison Apple?

Move over, Foxconn. First Pegatron and now Jabil have joined you on the Apple-watcher hit list.

In June, the New York-based employee rights group known as China Labor Watch singled out three Pegatron sites for worker abuse. The alleged violations are now like a refrain: excessive overtime, harsh working conditions and employment of underage workers.

Today it was Jabil’s turn, as its Green Point unit in Wuxi drew CLW’s ire. Perhaps most concerning is the accusation that Jabil workers must agree to a “list of punishments.” That sounds sickening and demeaning.

The common thread, of course, is Apple, whose corporate standards are apparently more for show than practice.

Chinese law prohibits more than 49 hours of work per week. Yet the CLW report shows 80% of the 80 Jabil workers interviewed put in more than that. While both Apple and many workers claim they want the overtime, the sad truth is they need to work the extra hours in order to make sufficient wages. Yet with Apple sitting on more than $100 billion in cash, it’s illogical to argue that company needs to suppress wages in order to make its iPhones and related products affordable to Western consumers.

Just 18 months ago, then Jabil CEO (and now chairman) Tim Main excoriated Foxconn for its “very abusive policies, employment policies.”

“I think their business will begin to suffer because of the way they treated their employees,” Main told Jabil shareholders. “And you can all be quite comfortable and proud that, you know, that’s not your company. We treat people like human beings like we want to … treat our own kids. So you don’t have to worry about that with us.”

Sadly, CLW’s report says something very different.

At the time of Main’s comments, Apple had just become a 10% customer of Jabil. Now, Apple is estimated to make up 13%, or $2.23 billion, of Jabil’s annual revenue. So like Foxconn and Pegatron, does serving Apple necessarily cost a company its soul?

Correlation is not causation, but the circumstantial evidence is getting mighty difficult to ignore. Will any EMS company be able to resist the temptation of Apple’s poisonous riches?

 

About Mike

Mike Buetow is editor-in-chief of Circuits Assembly magazine, the leading publication for electronics manufacturing, and PCD&F, the leading publication for printed circuit design and fabrication. He is also vice president and editorial director of UP Media Group, for which he oversees all editorial and production aspects. He has more than 20 years' experience in the electronics industry, including six years at IPC, an electronics trade association, at which he was a technical projects manager and communications director. He has also held editorial positions at SMT Magazine, community newspapers and in book publishing. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois. Follow Mike on Twitter: @mikebuetow
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